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Hearing loss questionnaire:

1. Enter your Age:    Years      

2. Select your Gender:
3. Do people complain that you aren't listening?
4. Do people complain that you turn the TV volume too high?
5. Do you understand men's voices better than women's?
6. Do you have trouble hearing birds or the wind in the trees?
7. Do voices sound blurry — like people mumble?
8. Do you have to ask people to repeat themselves frequently, even in quiet rooms?
9. Do you need to turn toward the person speaking or cup your ear to understand what is being said?
10. Do you find yourself confusing words or making silly mistakes?
11. Do you miss hearing common sounds, like the ringing of the phone or doorbell?
12. Do you have difficulty hearing in public gathering places — concert halls, theaters, houses of worship — where sound sources are far from the listener?
13. Do you have difficulty hearing television and/or on the telephone?
14. Do you have trouble understanding conversation within a group of people?
15. Do you avoid group meetings, social occasions, or family gatherings where listening may be difficult or where one may feel embarrassed about misunderstanding what is being said?
16. Has a friend or family member mentioned that you could have a hearing problem ?

17. Have you ever had deafness or trouble hearing with one or both ears?

18. Did you ever see a doctor about it?

19. Without a hearing aid, can you usually not hear and understand what a person says without seeing his or her face if that person whispers to you from across the room?

20 Without a hearing aid, can you usually not hear and understand what a person says without seeing his or her face if that person talks to you in a normal voice from across the room?

Hearing loss
Your ability to hear is as unique as your fingerprint. No two people have exactly the same hearing impairment. Work-place noise, loud hobbies, inherited medical conditions, childhood and adult illness all combine to produce different types of hearing loss in different people.
Ear care tips
Have your ears examined at least once every year by your physician, audiologist, or any hearing specialist.
The ear is normally a self-cleaning mechanism. Wax acts in a protective manner, catching particles that may land in the ear. Fine hairs inside the ear canal constantly move wax and sloughed skin out of the canal. Wax and skin can build up inside the ear canal. If the canal is not clean, the eardrum can become completely blocked, greatly reducing hearing and eventually cause permanent damage.
One cause of excessive wax buildup is the use of cotton swabs. A cotton swab is larger than the ear canal. Sometimes, when you use a cotton swab to clean your ear, you can push wax deeper into the ear canal and partially or completely block it.
One cause of excessive wax buildup is the use of cotton swabs. A cotton swab is larger than the ear canal. Sometimes, when you use a cotton swab to clean your ear, you can push wax deeper into the ear canal and partially or completely block it.
To maintain a clean and healthy ear canal, use an eye dropper to place two or three drops of pure apple cider vinegar in your ears, two to three times a week. You can also flush out the ear canal using warm water with a rubber syringe. Be very careful in attempting to do this. You do not want to aim the stream from the syringe directly toward your eardrum.
If you have itching inside your ear canal, use an eye dropper to place a few drops of baby oil in your canal once or twice a week to lubricate.

Visit your physician or hearing specialist regularly if you frequently have fluid in your middle ear. Fluid normally drains from the ear via the eustachian tube. If the eustachian tube becomes blocked, fluid can:

  • cause damage to the small bones in the middle ear,
  • cause extreme pain,
  • and possibly rupture the eardrum.
If pus flows from any part of your ear, you probably have some kind of infection and should see a physician immediately. You can lose your hearing if you allow the condition to continue.
Common symptoms associated with hearing impairment are ringing sounds in the ears, a feeling of pressure in the ears, and dizziness. Call your doctor your hearing health care professional to test your hearing if you experience these symptoms, particularly if you've recently began taking a new medication or experienced some kind of head trauma.
Common childhood diseases such as mumps, measles, scarlet fever, whooping cough, or any high fever can leave permanent hearing impairment. Always have your child's hearing tested if he/she has had any of these conditions in addition to regular ear care.
Women who are exposed to German measles, measles, mumps, or any other viral diseases during their pregnancies have a very high risk of giving birth to a baby with serious hearing impairment. Have your baby's hearing tested if you have been exposed to these conditions during your pregnancy, or even if you suspect hearing impairment.
Source:
http://www.geriatricsatyourfingertips.org
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